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20130420
20130420
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why now? i want to share a few things. one is that once we start implementing the law and the mechanisms started falling in place and in the first year we got 1,000 cases nudged and then results. .. the mechanism is one thing. the greeting that oxygen, the way we can breed of the greeting as space for rigging a plan and not be bastrop away. women who complain, stigma and retaliation. that is the part that probably would need to focus on. the other thing i felt was that it was really a universal issue. i, during my struggle in the last ten years, have probably read about every sexual-harassment case. and every country, i went to japan a month ago and there it was everywhere in the public place and offices. so i felt like this is something that we really need to a not divide up the world, and this is the part where women have problems and this is a part of the world that has the outcome. we will need to develop a bond of solidarity. when need to talk about our struggles. countries like pakistan, one case of a gang rape or something happens and then it goes into the media
proponents thinks these weapons are a problem in the hands of law-abiegd citizens, but apparently see no problem with the same weapons being galorified in hollywood movies or video games, where the game is interactive, violent, and you are literally shooting at people. >> jon: that's one, video games you are not literally shooting at people. ( laughter ) what you're shooting it isaise series of 0s and 1s organized into a two-dimension stall representation of a three-dimensional-- i guess i'm not considering the real-world consequences of checking to see if someone buying a gun on the internet is a convicted felon who moderates a charlie manson message board. "hey, guys, let's not get off topic. you want to talk about 'live with kelly and michael' that's a different board. you have to keep the conversation here manson related." >> in my opinion, adopting mandatory federal government background checks for purely private transactions between law abiding citizens puts u inexoray on the path for a itself registration. >> it is not currently proposed but if the bill being considered were a
--from personal grievance to public law". the book describes what happened when 11 women joined the campaign to go into the un only to be attacked by there un managers. the case culminated in legislation by the pakistani parliament in 2000 that make sexual harassment crime. she is the chair person, and human rights and democracy streaming and research on news activism and environment. and based in washington d.c. at the national endowment for democracy. and over red light areas, released by oxford and forgotten cases. and in japanese have become popular among young pakistani women. and the doctorate working at the university of minnesota. please join in welcoming today's guest dr. fouzia saeed. [applause] >> very nice to be here and i look forward to the next hour of engagement with you. if you want to turn this off you can, at least up to the limit. i am going to tell you a story today and the stories in the context of pakistan, about one woman and also celebration of women in pakistan but it resonates universally, goes across borders. this is about a legislation we got in pakistan against sexual
office's election law. people in the country will get their first taste of online campaigning starting with this summer's upper house race. >> reporter: the bill was passed unanimously by the upper house. from now on, political parties, candidates, and voters will be allowed to enlist public support on websites and social networking services. japanese law has long limited the number of paper documents that can be distributed during official election campaigns. the rule was meant to keep candidates with a financial edge from getting an unfair advantage. but the law enacted in 1950 did not envision the internet. so documents and images in cyberspace have been regulated in the same way. japan has lagged behind other countries such as the united states, britain and germany where there are few restrictions on internet election campaigning. >> translator: communication tools are completely different from the old days. it's good to update the law. >> translator: i'm all for the revision. i'm busy with my job in child care and it's been hard to obtain certain information. >> reporter: the deba
of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather, is grounded in a hoe row and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constitute torture. in addition, you look at the united states state department, in its annual country reports on human rights practices, has characterized many of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in the post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse, or cruel treatment when those techniques were employed by foreign governments. the c.i.a. recognized this in an internal review and that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with policy, positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticized another nation for engaging in tor
ago. >> we are hearing that from a law-enforcement official. there was an interview at the request of a foreign government. concernequested out of that the fbi spoke with him two years ago because there was concern that before he was about to make an overseas trip, he had in extremist ties. the fbi spoke with him and reported back to the foreign government that they had no concern and this trip would be ok. following this trip, we are hearing that he went to russia where he had family and he came back much more religious and much more observant of his islamic faith. this came from friends that knew him. this is something that will now be a part of this investigation as the president, after speaking with reporters, following the arrest, there will be a full investigation and the full federal resources will be dedicated to answering some of these questions. that is one question that will be examined -- if there was a concern and he was on the radar, why wasn't it followed up on? thank you. more and more is being learned about the two tysarnaev brothers. there were chechen nationals w
of border enforcement as part of its broader anti-crime law enforcement. those efforts were part of that democratic thinking and action at the time. they took up the issue of border enforcement in a role that has become a tint to it -- a continuous stream since research. intoudgets that went building the border and building the southwest border capability started in 1994. those budgets, i think when you look back at the record, the official start. taking border enforcement seriously. and putting a border effort into place that has become, since, a bipartisan support it issue. the question of putting them into the border has been a continuous stream since 1994. requests and appropriations, when republicans and democrats led the white house and both republicans and democrats led either in the senate or house overall. this is an unbroken chain and continues to go. we see it in day to day. we will see when a bill is announced tomorrow or whenever, having continuing emphasis on border security and on spending on border security. with the initial budget, we worked on the border in ways
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7